Take a Ball of String - Tablet Cover - Free Pattern!

Thursday, December 3, 2015

This utilitarian cover knitted in string has a contrasting leather buckle and is great for protecting your tablet from scratches and knocks

This utilitarian cover knitted in string has a contrasting leather buckle and is great for protecting your tablet from scratches and knocks. You could make a much larger one for a laptop and use two buckles to fasten it.

 

Supplies:

100yds (915m) bakers’ twine or household string for the mini size; 150yds (138m) for the standard size

4mm (UK8:US6) knitting needles

Small crochet hook or large darning needle to finish off ends

Leather buckle

Waxed linen thread

Sewing needle and pins

Sewing machine

Steam iron

Sharp scissors

 

Size:

To fit a mini tablet measuring approximately 8 x 5¼ x¹/³in (200 x 135 x 7.5mm) [standard tablet measuring approximately 9½ x 6½ x¹/³in (240 x 170 x 7.5mm)]

 

Tension:

4 sts x 6 rows to 1in (2.5cm) square, in stocking stitch using 4mm needles. The cover should be a snug fit, so it is important to check tension.

 

Main piece

Using 4mm needles, cast on 24[32] sts.

Work 92[100] rows in stocking stitch.

Decrease row: K2tog tbl, k to last 2 sts,
k2tog (22[30] sts).

Next row: Sl1, knit to end.

Rep last row 20 times.

Final row: Skpo, cast off 20[28] sts, sl last st onto right needle, pass st on right over the sl st, cut string to 4in (10cm) and use a needle or small crochet hook to thread the tail through a few stitches before cutting flush. Press work using a hot iron. Finish off any ends using a large darning needle or a small crochet hook.

 

Making up

Lay the work out, right side up and with the cast-on edge nearest you. Fold the lower edge up to align with the decrease row. Pin the edges together with right sides facing and join using a sewing machine or by hand.

Turn the cover the right side out. Slip the tablet into the case to check fit.

Fold the flap down snugly and pin the buckle in place.

 

Finishing off

Undo buckle and sew both halves in place using waxed thread and a needle (5).

Work all the way round the leather buckle pieces with the waxed thread using running stitch. Turn and continue to stitch around the buckle once more, so that your stitches fill the gaps. It’s also a good idea to sew double stitches on either side where the buckle pieces join just to give extra strength.

 

Tip

If you want to make a cover for a laptop, draw a paper pattern and use your tension square to work out how many stitches you need to cast on. Check the knitting against the laptop as you progress, to calculate when to work the decrease row.

 

Stocking stitch

This is formed by working the first and every odd row in knit stitch, and the second and every even row in purl stitch. The first row is usually the right side. The resulting work is smooth on one side and bumpy like garter stitch on the reverse.

 

Methods for Decreasing

Work two stitches together (k2tog or p2tog)This creates a right-hand sloping stitch on the knit side of your work.

 

On a knit row, insert the right-hand needle through two stitches instead of one.

Knit them together as if they were one stitch.

 

On a purl row, insert the needle purlwise through the two stitches.

Purl in the usual way.

 

 

Work two stitches together through the back loops (k2tog tbl or p2tog tbl)

This produces a left-sloping stitch on the front of the work.

On a knit row, insert the right-hand needle knitwise through the back loops of the next two stitches on the left-hand needle.

Knit them as if they were one stitch.

 

On a purl row (p2tog tbl), insert the right-hand needle purlwise through the back loops. Purl them as if they were one stitch.

 

Slip one, knit one, pass slipped stitch over (skpo)

This also creates a left-sloping stitch on the front of the work.

Slip the next stitch on to the right-hand needle as if to knit it. Knit the next stitch. Lift the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch (A) and drop it off the needle (B).

 

 

On a purl row (sppo), slip one, purl one, pass slipped stitch over.

 

Sewn seams

When working with cotton thread, yarn or string that have little elasticity, you can join straight or simple seams by machine. First, pin or tack the edges right sides together, then sew. Reverse stitch at either end for extra strength.

If you have no sewing machine, join the seams by hand using a darning needle and mattress stitch (A).

 

Taken from Take a Ball of String by Jemima Schlee, published by GMC (£12.99, available from www.thegmcgroup.com)

Take a ball of string

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